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    More Home Canning Recipes | Summer 2013 Out Here Magazine

    By Carol Davis

    Photography by Mark Mosrie

    With the information and tools available today, you can successfully preserve just about anything you want - Tractor Supply Co.

    With the information and tools available today, you can successfully preserve just about anything you want.

    Reasons for preserving fresh food varies with each individual, but some may include:

    • To avoid commercially canned foods full of preservatives and salt
    • Support a thriving local food movement
    • A preference for organics
    • Saving money by purchasing in quantities
    • An interest in heritage skills
    • Storing a bumper crop of summer fruits and vegetables

    All are reasons why home preserving is experiencing a resurgence in popularity, says Judy Price, of Rochester, N.Y., a Cornell University Cooperative Extension expert who teaches Master Food Preservation classes.

    With the information and tools available today, you can successfully preserve just about anything you want, she says.

    The key to making your food safe and tasty is to follow the latest guidelines developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Center for Home Food Preservation (nchfp.uga.edu), she says.

    And always follow those directions, she says.

    It's unsafe to add ingredients to a food you're canning and then preserve it in the same way as the original food because the ingredients you added may change the required processing time or method, she explains.

    "You can't safely change the (acidity) of a product," she says, "and you can't thicken it because the heat will not penetrate it in the same way."
    The best approach is to follow a recipe from The National Center for Home Food Preservation or canning books published by reputable companies, she says.

    "If you follow the directions," Judy says, "you will have a safe and high-quality product."

    If this is your first time canning, it is recommended that you go to the National Center for Home Food Preservation's website at nchfp.uga.edu and click on "Publications," and then on "U.S. Department of Agriculture," and select "Principles of Home Canning."

    BLACKBERRY JAM WITH LIQUID PECTIN

    Please read "Using Boiling Water Canners" before beginning. Go to the National Center for Home Food Preservation's website at nchfp.uga.edu and click on "Publications," and then on "The University of Georgia," and select, "Using Boiling Water Canners."

    Ingredients:

    • 4 cups blackberries (about 2 quart boxes), crushed
    • 7 cups sugar
    • 1 pouch liquid pectin
    • Yield — About 8 or 9 half-pint jars

    Procedure:

    1. Sterilize canning jars and prepare two-piece canning lids according to manufacturer's directions.
    2. Sort and wash fully ripe berries; remove any stems and caps.
    3. Crush berries and extract juice.
    4. Measure crushed blackberries into a kettle. Add sugar and stir well. Place on high heat and, stirring constantly, bring quickly to a full boil with bubbles over the entire surface.
    5. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and stir in pectin. Skim.
    6. Fill hot jam immediately into hot, sterile jars, leaving ¼ inch of headspace.
    7. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel; adjust two-piece metal canning lids.
    8. Process in a boiling water canner according to your altitude.

    Recommended time for Blackberry Jam in a boiling water canner for half-pints or pints:

    • 0-1,000 feet altitude 5 minutes
    • 1,001-6,000 feet altitude 10 minutes
    • Above 6,000 feet 15 minutes

    PICKLED BEETS

    Please read "Using Boiling Water Canners" before beginning. Go to the National Center for Home Food Preservation's website at nchfp.uga.edu and click on "Publications," and then on "The University of Georgia," and select, "Using Boiling Water Canners."

    Ingredients:

    • 7 lbs. of 2- to 2½- inch diameter beets
    • 4 cups vinegar (5 percent)
    • 1½ tsp. canning or pickling salt
    • 2 cups sugar
    • 2 cups water
    • 2 cinnamon sticks
    • 12 whole cloves
    • 4 to 6 onions (2- to 2½-inch diameter), if desired
    • Yield — About 8 pints

    Procedure:

    1. Trim off beet tops, leaving 1 inch of stem and roots to prevent bleeding of color. Wash thoroughly. Sort for size.
    2. Cover similar sizes together with boiling water and cook until tender (about 25 to 30 minutes). Caution: Drain and discard liquid. Cool beets.
    3. Trim off roots and stems and slip off skins. Slice into 1/4-inch slices.
    4. Peel and thinly slice onions.
    5. Combine vinegar, salt, sugar, and fresh water. Put spices in cheesecloth bag and add to vinegar mixture. Bring to a boil. Add beets and onions.
    6. Simmer 5 minutes.
    7. Remove spice bag.
    8. Fill jars with beets and onions, leaving ½-inch headspace. Add hot vinegar solution, allowing ½-inch headspace.
    9. Adjust lids and process in a boiling water canner according to your altitude.

    Recommended processing time for hot-pack Pickled Beets in a boiling water canner for pints or quarts:

    • 0-1,000 feet altitude 30 minutes
    • 1,001-3,000 feet altitude 35 minutes
    • 3,001-6,000 feet altitude 40 minutes
    • Above 6,000 feet 45 minutes

    Variation: Pickled whole baby beets. Follow above directions but use beets that are 1 to 1½ inches in diameter. Pack whole; do not slice. Onions may be omitted.

    APPLESAUCE

    Depending on how you're processing your applesauce, please read either, "Using Pressure Canners" or "Using Boiling Water Canners" before beginning. Go to the National Center for Home Food Preservation's website at nchfp.uga.edu and click on "Publications," and then on "The University of Georgia," and select either "Using Boiling Water Canners" or "Using Pressure Canners."

    Ingredients:

    • An average of 21 pounds is needed per canner load of 7 quarts; an average of 13½ pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints. A bushel weighs 48 pounds and yields 14 to 19 quarts of sauce — an average of 3 pounds per quart.
    • Select apples that are sweet, juicy, and crisp. For a tart flavor, add 1 to 2 pounds of tart apples to each 3 pounds of sweeter fruit.

    Procedure:

    • Wash, peel, and core apples. If desired, slice apples into water containing ascorbic acid to prevent browning.
    • Place drained slices in an 8- to 10-quart pot. Add ½ cup water. Stirring occasionally to prevent burning, heat quickly until tender (5 to 20 minutes, depending on maturity and variety).
    • Press through a sieve or food mill, or skip the pressing step if you prefer chunk-style sauce. Sauce may be packed without sugar. If desired, add 1/8 cup sugar per quart of sauce. Taste and add more, if preferred. Reheat sauce to boiling.
    • Fill jars with hot sauce, leaving ½-inch headspace.
    • Adjust lids and process according to kind of canner you are using:

    Boiling Water Canner

    PINTS

    • 0-1,000 feet altitude 15 minutes
    • 1,001-3,000 feet altitude 20 minutes
    • 3,001-6,000 feet altitude 20 minutes
    • Above 6,000 feet 25 minutes

    QUARTS

    • 0-1,000 feet altitude 20 minutes
    • 1,001-3,000 feet altitude 25 minutes
    • 3,001-6,000 feet altitude 30 minutes

    Above 6,000 feet 35 minutes

    Dial-Gauge Pressure Canner

    PINTS

    Process time: 8 minutes

    • 0-2,000 feet altitude 6 lbs.
    • 2,001-4,000 feet altitude 7 lbs.
    • 4,001-6,000 feet altitude 8 lbs.
    • 6,001-8,000 feet 9 lbs.

    QUARTS

    Process time: 10 minutes

    • 0-2,000 feet altitude 6 lbs.
    • 2,001-4,000 feet altitude 7 lbs.
    • 4,001-6,000 feet altitude 8 lbs.
    • 6,001-8,000 feet 9 lbs.

    Weighted-Gauge Pressure Canner

    PINTS

    Process time: 8 minutes

    • 0-1,000 feet altitude 5 lbs.
    • Above 1,000 feet altitude 10 lbs.

    QUARTS

    Process time: 10 minutes

    • 0-1,000 feet altitude 5 lbs.
    • Above 1,000 feet altitude 10 lbs.