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    Safety Precautions For Engine-powered Welders | Winter 2012 Out Here Magazine

     

    Out Here

    Courtesy of the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension

    Photography by Mike Roemer

    An engine-powered welder, as opposed to an electric arc welder, has its own set of hazards.

    Used improperly, an engine-powered welder can create such hazards as burns, toxic fumes, fires, and more.

    First and foremost, always provide yourself and those around you with good ventilation, fire prevention, personal protection, and safe operation.

    These tips will help you complete projects safely with your engine-powered welder:

    • Always operate in an open well-ventilated area or vent the engine exhaust directly outdoors.
    • Never fuel the engine while running or in the presence of an open flame.
    • Wipe up spilled fuel immediately and wait for fumes to disperse before starting the engine.
    • Never remove the radiator pressure cap from liquid-cooled engines while they are hot. This will prevent scalding.
    • Stop the engine before performing any maintenance or trouble-shooting. The ignition system should be disabled to prevent accidental start of the engine.
    • Keep all guards and shields in place.
    • Keep hands, hair, and clothing away from moving parts.

    Hazardous materials

    Materials included in the very hazardous category are welding rod fluxes, coverings, or other materials containing fluorine compounds, zinc, lead, beryllium, admium, and mercury.

    Some cleaning and degreasing compounds, as well as the metals they were cleaned with, are also hazardous.

    Always follow the manufacturer’s precautions before welding or cutting in the presence of these materials.

    When welding or cutting metals with hazardous coatings, such as galvanized metal, the operator should use a supplied-air type respirator or a respirator specially designed to filter the specific metal fume.

    Information courtesy of the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension.

     
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