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    Disaster Preparedness for Pets

    Emergencies come in many forms, and they may require anything from a brief absence from your home to a permanent evacuation. Each type of disaster requires different measures to keep your pets safe. The best thing you can do for yourself and your pets is to be prepared.

    Plan a Safe Location for Pets

    Arrange a safe place for your pets in the event of an emergency. DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS BEHIND. If the place you are leaving is no longer safe for you, then chances are they are no longer safe for your pet as well. Pets may become trapped or may escape the disaster just to find themselves at risk from any number of dangerous situations. It is important that you have a safe place to take your pets in event of an emergency as not all Red Cross shelters will accept pets.

    • Speak with a vet to see if there are any preffered kennel or pet housing locations in your area.
    • Contact your local shelter to see if they offer emergency housing for animals in disaster situations
    • Make a list of hotels that accept pets that is outside your local area.
    • If you have any friends or relatives that would take in your pet if something should arise, let them know they are your "Pet Emergency Care Giver".

    Pet Preparedness Kits & Supplies

    Keep a survival kit and supplies handy for your pets. Make sure that everyone in the family knows where it is. This kit should be clearly labeled and easy to carry. Items to consider keeping in or near your pack include:

    • Pet first-aid kit and guide book (ask your vet what to include, or visit the ASPCA Store to buy one online)
    • 3-7 days' worth of canned (pop-top) or dry food (be sure to rotate every two months)
    • Disposable litter trays (aluminum roasting pans are perfect)
    • Litter or paper toweling
    • Liquid dish soap and disinfectant
    • Disposable garbage bags for clean-up
    • Pet feeding dishes
    • Extra collar or harness as well as an extra leash
    • Photocopies of medical records and a waterproof container with a two-week supply of any medicine your pet requires (Remember, food and medications need to be rotated out of your emergency kit-otherwise they may go bad or become useless.)
    • Bottled water, at least 7 days' worth for each person and pet (store in a cool, dry place and replace every two months)
    • A traveling bag, crate or sturdy carrier, ideally one for each pet
    • Flashlight
    • Blanket (for scooping up a fearful pet)
    • Recent photos of your pets (in case you are separated and need to make "Lost" posters)

    Especially for cats: Pillowcase or EvackSack, toys, scoopable litter

    Especially for dogs: Extra leash, toys and chew toys, a week's worth of cage liner.

    Step 3   Choose “Designated Caregivers”

    This step will take considerable time and thought. When choosing a temporary caregiver, consider someone who lives close to your residence. He or she should be someone who is generally home during the day while you are at work or has easy access to your home. A set of keys should be given to this trusted individual. This may work well with neighbors who have pets of their own-you may even swap responsibilities, depending upon who has accessibility.

    When selecting a permanent caregiver, you'll need to consider other criteria. This is a person to whom you are entrusting the care of your pet in the event that something should happen to you. When selecting this "foster parent," consider people who have met your pet and have successfully cared for animals in the past. Be sure to discuss your expectations at length with a permanent caregiver, so he or she understands the responsibility of caring for your pet.

    Step 4  Evacuation Preparation

    If you must evacuate your home in a crisis, plan for the worst-case scenario. If you think you may be gone for only a day, assume that you may not be allowed to return for several weeks. When recommendations for evacuation have been announced, follow the instructions of local and state officials. To minimize evacuation time, take these simple steps:

    • Store an emergency kit and leashes as close to an exit as possible.
    • Make sure all pets wear collars and tags with up-to-date identification. Your pet's ID tag should contain his name, telephone number, and any urgent medical needs. Be sure to write your pet's name, your name and contact information on your pet's carrier.
    • Microchipping your pet is a more permanent form of identification. A microchip is implanted in the animal's shoulder area, and can be read by scanner at most animal shelters.
    • Always bring pets indoors at the first sign or warning of a storm or disaster. Pets can become disoriented and wander away from home during a crisis.
    • Consider your evacuation route and call ahead to make arrangements for boarding your pet outside of the danger zone at the first sign of disaster.

    Step 5  Geographic and Climatic Considerations

    Do you live in an area that is prone to certain natural catastrophes, such as tornadoes, earthquakes or floods? If so, you should plan accordingly.

    Determine well in advance which rooms offer safe havens. These rooms should be clear of hazards such as windows, flying debris, etc.

    Choose easy-to-clean areas such as utility rooms, bathrooms, and basements as safe zones. 
    Access to a supply of fresh water is particularly important. In areas that may lose electricity, fill up bathtubs and sinks ahead of time to ensure that you have access to water during a power outage or other crises.

    In the event of flooding, go to the highest location in your home, or a room that has access to counters or high shelves where your animals can take shelter.

    If emergency officials recommend that you stay in your home, it's crucial that you keep your pets with you. Keep your survival kit and supplies close at hand. Your pets may become stressed during the in-house confinement, so you may consider crating them for safety and comfort.

    Special Considerations for Birds:

    • Birds should be transported in a secure travel cage or carrier.
    • In cold weather, make certain you have a blanket over your pet’s cage. This may also help reduce the stress of traveling.
    • In warm weather, carry a spray bottle to periodically moisten your bird's feathers.
    • Have recent photos available, and keep your bird’s leg bands on for identification.
    • If the carrier does not have a perch, line it with paper towels that you can change frequently.
    • Keep the carrier in as quiet an area as possible.
    • It is particularly imperative that birds eat on a daily basis, so purchase a timed feeder. If you need to leave your bird unexpectedly, the feeder will ensure his daily feeding schedule.
    • Items to keep on hand: Catch net, heavy towel, blanket or sheet to cover cage, cage liner.

    Special Considerations for Reptiles:

    • A snake may be transported in a pillowcase, but you should have permanent and secure housing for him when you reach a safe place.
    • Take a sturdy bowl that is large for your pet to soak in. It’s also a good idea to bring along a heating pad or other warming device, such as a hot water bottle.
    • Lizards can be transported like birds (see above).

    Special Considerations for Small Animals:

    Small animals, such as hamsters, gerbils, mice and guinea pigs, should be transported in secure carriers with bedding materials, food and food bowls.

    Items to keep on hand: Salt lick, extra water bottle, small hidebox or tube, a week's worth of bedding.