The web browser you are using is out of date and no longer supported by this site. For the best TractorSupply.com experience, please consider updating your browser to the latest version.
Buy Online Pick Up in Store Now available - Tractor Supply Co.
Navigate to Shopping Cart
Cart Item Count
 
  • Left Arrow
    My Account
  • Left Arrow
    My Account
  • Make My Store

    Your nearest store doesn't match your preferred store. Do you want to change the nearest store as your preferred store?

    CONFIRM CLEAR INFO?

    Click "YES" to clear all the customer data, cart contents and start new shopping session.

    Your current shopping session will get automatically reset in seconds.
    If you are still active user then please click "NO"

    Changing your store affects your localized pricing. This includes the price of items you already have in your shopping cart. Are you sure you want to change your store?

    Your nearest store doesn't match your preferred store. Do you want to change the nearest store as your preferred store?


    • To Shop Online
    • To Check In-Store Availability

    click here
    We do not share this information with anyone. For details,please view our Privacy Policy

    What to Do If You Are Stung

    We are not medical personnel, and we do not make any claims as such. We have, however, experienced our share of stings and reactions, and this is what our experience has been.

    Content supplied by Harvest Lane Honey

    We are not medical personnel, and we do not make any claims as such. We have, however, experienced our share of stings and reactions, and this is what our experience has been.

    When you are a beekeeper, bee stings are inevitable. It is the same concept as getting burned while cooking: it shouldn't be a common occurrence when taking proper precautions, but on the occasion that it does happen, knowing what to do will help. Wearing proper clothing will help to decrease the occurrences of bee stings. We suggest that you wear a full bee suit with a protective hood and gloves. A proper fitting bee suit will be loose fitting. Remember a bee can only sting what it can grab on to; therefore, it is not the density of the clothing that provides protection but the looseness, which prevents the sting from reaching your skin.

    Honey bees only sting in self-defense or when they feel threatened. Unlike wasps, or yellow jackets, honey bees can only sting one time because the stinger is attached to their abdomen. After a honey bee stings the thick skin of a mammal, the stinger embeds and tears out of the honey bee, resulting in the honey bee's death. The reason that the stinger is torn out of the honey bee is because a small barb is attached at the end of the stinger, which causes the stinger to be embedded in the skin. On the opposite end of the stinger there is a venom sac. The sac will continue pumping venom until empty. You might be able to smell the pheromones (which smell like bananas) that the stinging bee puts off after a sting. These pheromones attract other bees. If the stinger is not removed, other honey bees in the hive will be attracted to the pheromones and will be inclined to sting as well, this is part of the honey bees natural instinct to protect their hive.

    It is very important to remove the stinger quickly to decrease the amount of venom as well as to dispel the pheromones. The best way to remove a stinger is to scrape the stinger off with a credit card or by using your finger nail. DO NOT pinch and pull, since pinching will increase the amount of venom that is pushed into the site. Once stinger is removed, wash with cold water and soap, this will remove the pheromones. The sting area might burn, itch, and possibly swell for a few hours. Using ice on the sting location and taking an antihistamine (i.e. Benadryl) will help with inflammation. In some cases a person may be highly allergic and suffer anaphylactic shock, which can be life-threatening and will require emergency treatment. We keep a self-injecting epinephrine such as EpiPen around in case this ever happens. If you are concerned about a sting, we always suggest that you seek the appropriate medical care.

    If you are in your bee yard, and a sting happens, stay calm. A raised heart rate together with the pheromones will increase the defenses of other bees. Calmly move to an area away from the open hive and remove the stinger quickly. We recommend smoking the sight of the sting, using your smoker. This will hide the pheromones and help prevent additional stings. Applying grass or mud to the affected area will also have the same masking affect. Always remain calm when working your bees. Keeping your heart rate low will also help keep your bees calm.