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How to Select a Fuel Pump

Man using a fuel pump in his truck

Defining the Job

Whether you need something for your home, farm, or small business, Tractor Supply Company has the fuel pump you need to get your job done. Let us help you decide which fuel pump is right for you by answering the questions below. Then you can shop online or visit your local store and a Tractor Supply Team Member will help you develop a solution for the job you want to do.

What do you want to do with your fuel pump?

Will you be fueling lawn mowers, small tractors, or other small equipment, or will you be fueling larger vehicles in heavy-duty applications? Alternatively, are you looking to transfer transmission fluid and antifreeze in smaller quantities?

How often will you use your fuel pump?

Will you be using the fuel pump occasionally or every day?

Where will you use your fuel pump?

Will you have access to a standard 115V power supply? Or will you be using the fuel pump in a mobile application (such as a truck bed)?

What type of fluid do you need to pump?

Not all pumps are suitable for all fluids. Some lubricant- or high-viscosity pumps, for example, are suitable for petroleum products such as transmission fluid, but not for diesel fuel or gasoline. Make sure your pump is suitable for the type of fluid you wish to transfer.

How important is pumping speed?

Will you be refueling a large tank (example: 200 gals) where time is critical or a smaller volume (8 gals) where time doesn’t matter? This will determine the gallons per minute (GPM) rating of your pump. The higher the GPM rating, the less time it will take to refuel. Electric models at Tractor Supply Company typically supply between 12 and 25 GPM. (By comparison, a typical gas station nozzle supplies 7-8 GPM.)

*Note: Automatic nozzles may restrict flow to a slightly lower GPM. This is normal.

Choosing the Right Fuel Pump

For occasional fueling of lawn mowers, small tractors, or other equipment with diesel, gas, or kerosene, a rotary or lever hand pump mounted on a small container (such as a 55-gallon drum) is fine. The rate of flow will depend on the speed at which you pump by hand. Hand pumps deliver from 8 ounces up to 1/2 gallon per stroke or revolution depending on pump model.

Electric pumps supply between 12 and 25 GPM. These pumps come in two varieties: a battery-powered 12V pump for use on construction sites and farms away from electrical service, and a 115V model (usually permanently installed near electrical service). The 115V models must be hard-wired to your power supply to comply with local codes. Tractor Supply Company does not furnish a power cord for these models.

IMPORTANT: When buying an electric pump, it is crucial that you take into account your power source. You cannot effectively power a 115V pump with a 12V battery. Likewise, powering a 12V pump with 115V household service will damage the pump and is potentially dangerous.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Do you have diesel pumps?

A: Yes. Tractor Supply Company offers a full line of electric and hand pumps to transfer gasoline (up to E15), diesel fuel (up to B20), and kerosene. Just visit your local Tractor Supply store and a team member will be happy to help you.

Q: Where can I get my fuel pump serviced?

A: If you call or go by your local Tractor Supply store, a team member will be happy to answer your service questions.

Q: Can I buy a meter for my pump?

A: Yes. Both mechanical and electronic meters are available. The mechanical meter is recommended for stationary applications. The electronic meter is best for hose-end applications.

Q: What is the difference between a 12V and 115V electric fuel pump?

A: The difference is the power supply required for the pump. You cannot effectively power a 115V pump with a 12V battery. Likewise, powering a 12V pump with 115V household service will damage the pump and is potentially dangerous. Make sure your pump matches your power supply!

Q: What is the difference between an automatic nozzle and a manual nozzle?

A: An automatic nozzle has an automatic shutoff feature, freeing your hands during refueling time. Automatic nozzles restrict the flow of your pump slightly (for example, reducing a 15 GPM output to a 12 GPM output). Automatic nozzles at your typical gas station produce a flow of 7-8 GPM. A manual nozzle has no automatic shutoff. You must manually operate the nozzle during the refueling process.

Note: Fuel pumps are designed for use with petroleum fuels. Observe all safety standards and cautions found in the product owner’s manual to avoid injury.

Make sure you have everything you need when you purchase your fuel pump from Tractor Supply. Here is a list of things usually recommended to put together a complete fueling station:

TSC Supplies:

What Else Do You Need?

For more information about buying a fuel pump from Tractor Supply, call or visit your local store and an expert team member will be happy to assist you!